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Showing items 1 through 9 of 6238.
  1. Library Resource
    Land Journal Volume 9 Issue 11 cover image

    Volume 9 Issue 11

    Peer-reviewed publication
    November, 2020
    Japan

    Development has fragmented urban nature, and target sites for conservation strategies need to be those that have long maintained their original land cover in a clustered area. Additionally, continuously grasping changes from rural to urban as well as changes over decades after urbanization is essential. Therefore, this study identified and investigated natural patches in urban landscapes, clarified actual management practices in the identified patches, and traced changes in land ownership and land cover during the past 130 years in the Tsukuba Science City, Japan.

  2. Library Resource
    Land Journal Volume 9 Issue 11 cover image

    Volume 9 Issue 11

    Peer-reviewed publication
    November, 2020
    Central African Republic, Ghana, Norway

    Development practice over recent years in much of Africa prioritized formalization of land policies deemed to enhance better handling and use of land as an asset for social development. Following this trend, land reform policy in Ghana was based on a pluralistic legal system in which both the customary land tenure system and the statutory system of land ownership and control co-exist by law. The primary research question for this study was the following: What implications emerge when customary land tenure system and the statutory system of land ownership and control co-exist in law?

  3. Library Resource
    Land Journal Volume 9 Issue 11 cover image

    Volume 9 Issue 11

    Peer-reviewed publication
    November, 2020
    China

    Traditional villages are important carriers of traditional cultural heritage, and they have strong historical, cultural, aesthetic and tourism value for all countries and the international community. In China, the number of traditional villages is currently decreasing each year, and the precious material and non-material heritage is at risk of disappearing in the process of urbanization.

  4. Library Resource

    Volume 9 Issue 10

    Peer-reviewed publication
    October, 2020
    United States of America, Italy

    Organic matter, an important component of healthy soils, may be used as an indicator in sustainability assessments. Managing soil carbon storage can foster agricultural productivity and environmental quality, reducing the severity and costs of natural phenomena. Thus, accurately estimating the spatial variability of soil organic matter (SOM) is crucial for sustainable soil management when planning agro-environmental measures at the regional level. SOM variability is very large in Italy, and soil organic carbon (SOC) surveys considering such variability are difficult and onerous.

  5. Library Resource

    Volume 9 Issue 10

    Peer-reviewed publication
    October, 2020
    British Indian Ocean Territory, Central African Republic, Central America, South America, Northern America, United States of America, China, India, Europe, Russia, Australia, Global

    Although the way in which vegetation phenology mediates the feedback of vegetation to climate systems is now well understood, the magnitude of these changes is still unknown. A thorough understanding of how the recent shift in phenology may impact on, for example, land surface temperature (LST) is important. To address this knowledge gap, it is important to quantify these impacts and identify patterns from the global to the regional scale.

  6. Library Resource

    Volume 9 Issue 10

    Peer-reviewed publication
    October, 2020
    Panama, Peru, United States of America

    The understanding of relationships between ecosystem services and the appropriate spatial scales for their analysis and characterization represent opportunities for sustainable land management. Bundles have appeared as an integrated method to assess and visualize consistent associations among multiple ecosystem services. Most of the bundle assessments focused on a static framework at a specific spatial scale.

  7. Library Resource

    Volume 9 Issue 10

    Peer-reviewed publication
    October, 2020
    Indonesia

    Indonesia has the most favorable climates for agriculture because of its location in the tropical climatic zones. The country has several commodities to support economics growth that are driven by key export commodities—e.g., oil palm, rubber, paddy, cacao, and coffee. Thus, identifying the main commodities in Indonesia using spatially-explicit tools is essential to understand the precise productivity derived from the agricultural sectors. Many previous studies have used predictions developed using binary maps of general crop cover.

  8. Library Resource

    Volume 9 Issue 10

    Peer-reviewed publication
    October, 2020
    Ethiopia, Kenya

    Many actors in agricultural research, development, and policy arenas require accurate information on the spatial extents of cropping and farming practices. While remote sensing provides ways for obtaining such information, it is often difficult to distinguish between different types of agricultural practices or identify particular farming systems. Stochastic system behavior or similarity in the spectral signatures of different system components can lead to misclassification.

  9. Library Resource

    Volume 9 Issue 10

    Peer-reviewed publication
    October, 2020
    Eastern Asia, Malaysia

    Drastic growth of urban populations has caused expansion of peri-urban areas—the transitional zone between a city and its hinterland. Although urbanisation may bring economic opportunities and improve infrastructure in an area, uncontrolled urban expansion towards peri-urban areas will negatively impact the environment and the community living within the area. Malaysia, for example, has become one of the most urbanised countries in East Asia. However, cities in Malaysia are relatively small and less densely populated compared with other cities in East Asia.

  10. Library Resource

    Volume 9 Issue 10

    Peer-reviewed publication
    October, 2020
    United Kingdom, Germany

    Spatially explicit assessments of ecosystem services (ES) potentials are a key component in supporting a sustainable land use management. The ES matrix method is a commonly used approach as it allows for a comparably fast, comprehensible and accessible ES assessment. As it is often based on land use/land cover data (LULC) with no spatial variability, a main critique is that the results fail to assess spatial variability at landscape levels, which limits the reliability of the outputs for spatial planning applications.

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